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The Blueway

The New England Aquarium’s Blueway vision reimagines the public’s waterfront experience in downtown Boston. A public promenade would radically open sightlines from the Greenway to the water’s edge at the far end of Central Wharf. The three-acre concept includes floating walkways, marine gardens, seating and gathering areas, and tidal zones where visitors can explore the Boston Harbor habitat and marine species.

Image: CBT Architects

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Climate Ready South Boston

This project is identifying solutions to protect South Boston, Fort Point, and the rest of the city from the impacts of climate change. It is one of several district-level efforts under Climate Ready Boston (along with projects in East Boston and Charlestown, to date). In community meetings, people have expressed eagerness for early action and strong preferences for “green infrastructure,” such as living shorelines and park spaces that provide public amenities while protecting the city.

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Dry Dock #4

A decommissioned ship repair site could be Boston’s most exciting new park, offering families a new reason to come to the waterfront. As imagined by The Trustees, the 5.5-acre space would be a model of climate-resilient design and a living laboratory for young people to explore the Boston Harbor’s ecology and economy, programmed in partnership with communities across the city.

Rendering by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc. Concept does not represent a finished design.

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East Eagle Street Electric Substation

East Boston residents are advocating for new recreational space on the Chelsea Creek, instead of a proposed high-voltage electric substation. The substation would be dangerously close to the water and prone to flooding, next to the American Legion Playground—one of the most popular parks and sports fields in the neighborhood—and near jet fuel storage. It would pose major threats to public safety, health, and local economic interests. A new recreational space would align with the vision for a publicly accessible and resilient coastal zone.

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Harborwalk

This 40-mile public walkway winds through seven Boston waterfront neighborhoods, stretching from the Chelsea Creek in East Boston to the Neponset River in Dorchester. Property owners are responsible for creating and maintaining the walkway and other public amenities in accordance with state-issued licenses. A new digital, interactive map from Boston Harbor Now offers a database of public benefits along the Harborwalk—including park space, seating areas, restrooms, fishing docks, and more.

Photo by Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism

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Moakley Park Vision Plan

Boston Parks and Recreation Department is planning for a vibrant and resilient future for the 60-acre Moakley Park. A community engagement process aims to create a plan for enhanced recreational and cultural uses, safety, connectivity to surrounding areas, and protection from coastal and storm water flooding.

Image: Stoss Landscape Urbanism

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North Charlestown / Lower Mystic Visioning

A public engagement effort aims to create a shared vision for new and enhanced waterfront connections, parks and open spaces, and walking and biking routes in North Charlestown. Led by the Mystic River Watershed Association (MyRWA) Greenways Program, the effort aims to connect people to the water’s edge from Sullivan Square to the Tobin Bridge, while also protecting the surrounding neighborhoods from coastal and inland flooding.

Rendering by Kleinfelder-Stoss-One Architecture. Concept does not represent a finished design.

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Piers Park 3

East Boston could be home to an iconic new park by The Trustees that seamlessly integrates into the Piers Park complex, honors its unique location on the Boston Harbor, and serves the East Boston community’s expressed needs. Exposed piers, rocky shoreline, and salt marsh would complement open, flexible spaces for active play and community programming—from movie screenings to gardening classes. The park would provide natural protection against sea-level rise and flooding.

Rendering by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc. Concept does not represent a finished design.

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Water Transportation

By taking advantage of its Harbor for public transportation, Boston could address mobility challenges while also supporting economic development in the region, enhancing quality of life for residents, and preparing for climate change. Boston Harbor Now is partnering with MassDOT and others to explore ways to scale our commuter and recreational water transportation system and link it to land-based transit options.

Photo: Galya Feierman

Additional Resources

Resilient Boston Harbor Vision

The City of Boston’s climate-ready waterfront vision and projects map.

Explore the plan

Imagine Boston 2030 Waterfront Vision

A plan for waterfront development in the City of Boston’s master plan.

Download the plan

Public Restrooms in the City of Boston

Interactive map and directory of City facilities by neighborhood.

Explore the map

Coastal Zone Management Coast Guide

Interactive map with 1,800 beaches, boat ramps, and other public access sites statewide.

Explore the map

Guide to the Working Port

Takeaways from Boston Harbor Now’s symposium on the 21st-century working port.

Read the guide

All Projects

The Blueway

The New England Aquarium’s Blueway vision reimagines the public’s waterfront experience in downtown Boston. A public promenade would radically open sightlines from the Greenway to the water’s edge at the far end of Central Wharf. The three-acre concept includes floating walkways, marine gardens, seating and gathering areas, and tidal zones where visitors can explore the Boston Harbor habitat and marine species.

Image: CBT Architects

Tags: Parks, Programs, Public Way

Climate Ready South Boston

This project is identifying solutions to protect South Boston, Fort Point, and the rest of the city from the impacts of climate change. It is one of several district-level efforts under Climate Ready Boston (along with projects in East Boston and Charlestown, to date). In community meetings, people have expressed eagerness for early action and strong preferences for “green infrastructure,” such as living shorelines and park spaces that provide public amenities while protecting the city.

Tags: Policy, Public Way, Resilience

Dry Dock #4

A decommissioned ship repair site could be Boston’s most exciting new park, offering families a new reason to come to the waterfront. As imagined by The Trustees, the 5.5-acre space would be a model of climate-resilient design and a living laboratory for young people to explore the Boston Harbor’s ecology and economy, programmed in partnership with communities across the city.

Rendering by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc. Concept does not represent a finished design.

Tags: Parks, Programs

East Eagle Street Electric Substation

East Boston residents are advocating for new recreational space on the Chelsea Creek, instead of a proposed high-voltage electric substation. The substation would be dangerously close to the water and prone to flooding, next to the American Legion Playground—one of the most popular parks and sports fields in the neighborhood—and near jet fuel storage. It would pose major threats to public safety, health, and local economic interests. A new recreational space would align with the vision for a publicly accessible and resilient coastal zone.

Tags: Parks, Policy, Resilience

Harborwalk

This 40-mile public walkway winds through seven Boston waterfront neighborhoods, stretching from the Chelsea Creek in East Boston to the Neponset River in Dorchester. Property owners are responsible for creating and maintaining the walkway and other public amenities in accordance with state-issued licenses. A new digital, interactive map from Boston Harbor Now offers a database of public benefits along the Harborwalk—including park space, seating areas, restrooms, fishing docks, and more.

Photo by Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism

Tags: Policy, Public Way

Moakley Park Vision Plan

Boston Parks and Recreation Department is planning for a vibrant and resilient future for the 60-acre Moakley Park. A community engagement process aims to create a plan for enhanced recreational and cultural uses, safety, connectivity to surrounding areas, and protection from coastal and storm water flooding.

Image: Stoss Landscape Urbanism

Tags: Parks, Programs, Resilience

North Charlestown / Lower Mystic Visioning

A public engagement effort aims to create a shared vision for new and enhanced waterfront connections, parks and open spaces, and walking and biking routes in North Charlestown. Led by the Mystic River Watershed Association (MyRWA) Greenways Program, the effort aims to connect people to the water’s edge from Sullivan Square to the Tobin Bridge, while also protecting the surrounding neighborhoods from coastal and inland flooding.

Rendering by Kleinfelder-Stoss-One Architecture. Concept does not represent a finished design.

Tags: Parks, Programs, Public Way, Resilience

Piers Park 3

East Boston could be home to an iconic new park by The Trustees that seamlessly integrates into the Piers Park complex, honors its unique location on the Boston Harbor, and serves the East Boston community’s expressed needs. Exposed piers, rocky shoreline, and salt marsh would complement open, flexible spaces for active play and community programming—from movie screenings to gardening classes. The park would provide natural protection against sea-level rise and flooding.

Rendering by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc. Concept does not represent a finished design.

Tags: Parks, Programs, Resilience

Water Transportation

By taking advantage of its Harbor for public transportation, Boston could address mobility challenges while also supporting economic development in the region, enhancing quality of life for residents, and preparing for climate change. Boston Harbor Now is partnering with MassDOT and others to explore ways to scale our commuter and recreational water transportation system and link it to land-based transit options.

Photo: Galya Feierman

Tags: Policy, Public Way