Video depicts how rising seas will affect South Boston

The developers who want to turn South Boston’s shuttered L Street Power Station into a huge complex of housing and office space know that rising seas will someday come for their waterfront site. Now they’re releasing a video that shows, in vivid detail, just how much and where that water might go.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Pitch A Blanket Day on Boston’s Waterfront

Join Boston Waterfront Partners to celebrate and enjoy public spaces on Boston’s waterfront. Pack a picnic, pitch a blanket, and enjoy games with friends and neighbors—and learn more about your rights along Boston’s waterfront, too.

Date: July 25, 5:30–7:00 p.m.
Location: The Public Green, Seaport District (1 Marina Park Drive)
More Information and RSVP: clf.org/publicspace

What’s next for Peddocks Island? Advocates are planning its future — and they want the public’s help

A sampling of ideas [are] being floated as part of the Peddocks Island Vision Plan, a long-term project to reimagine and develop the second-largest Boston Harbor island, with the hope of attracting more visitors to its shorelines.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Boston Waterfront Partners submit joint comment on Northern Avenue Bridge proposals

Boston Waterfront Partners jointly submitted a comment letter to the City of Boston about the Northern Avenue Bridge redevelopment, noting that “a bridge designed for the people of our city, not for its cars, is an important milestone in the progress you have made to a more equitable, welcoming, and resilient waterfront.”

Read the full comment letter here.

→Source: Boston Waterfront Partners

In the Great Marsh and other coastal wetlands, climate change is harming delicate ecosystems

Wetlands such as [the Great Marsh] are crucial buffers against the damaging effects of rising sea levels from climate change. Yet the very forces unleashed by global warming are pounding away at the Great Marsh and other saltwater wetlands: higher tides — more than 8 inches here over the past century — and a 20 percent increase in precipitation over roughly the same period.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Chelsea Creek Visioning Community Meeting

Help shape the future of the Chelsea Creek waterfront in Chelsea and East Boston. Breakfast and lunch, interpretation, and childcare will be provided.

Date: June 1, 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Location: Kelly Elementary School, Mary C. Burke Complex, Chelsea
More Information: facebook.com/events

TACC Waterways Data Walk – Connecting Residents of Roxbury and North Dorchester to Boston’s Waterfront

Explore what The American City Coalition (TACC) and partners Kelley Chunn & Associates and Denterlein have learned from their Waterways project and discuss solutions for building a stronger connection between Boston’s neighborhoods and the waterfront.

Date: May 31, 8:00–10:00 a.m.
Location: Boston Society of Architects, 290 Congress Street, Boston
RSVP: Email charlotte_rice@tamcc.org by May 24

Beyond Walls Launches an Idea for Lynn’s Waterfront

The creative nonprofit has partnered with MassDevelopment and the civic crowdfunding platform Patronicity to build a temporary waterfront park at the Lynn Ferry Terminal, according to a press release. They need to raise $50,000 before they can get it up and running.

→Source: ItemLive

BPDA Flood Resilient Building Guidelines & Zoning Overlay District Open House

Join the Boston Planning & Development Agency (BPDA) for an open house on the City of Boston’s efforts to promote buildings that are better adapted to coastal flooding and sea level rise. This is an opportunity to learn about the development of flood resilient building guidelines and resiliency zoning, talk to experts, and provide input.

Date: May 14, 6:30–8:00 p.m.
Location: East Boston YMCA
More Information: bostonplans.org/news-calendar

As Boston Pursues Climate Resilience, Some Warn Efforts Could Make Inequality Worse

The city’s resilience initiatives are wrapped in the language of equity — in Walsh’s words, representing “Boston’s historic commitment to our collective well-being.” But some experts worry the push for climate adaptation could make inequality worse, a possible multiplier of the so-called “green gentrification” they say is already underway in two neighborhoods at the center of the city’s climate resilience strategy: East Boston and South Boston.

→Source: WBUR

Recurring events