News

Ferry Proposal Aims To Connect Downtown, Dorchester And Quincy

Development along Boston’s waterfront has led to greater demand for transportation, and that need could be met by new ferries serving downtown Boston, Quincy and Dorchester, according to two business plans released Tuesday.

→Source: WBUR

Nonprofit floats details about new proposed Boston Harbor ferry routes

The business plans for two new Boston Harbor ferry routes are done. Now comes the hard part: finding someone willing to secure and administer these boats, and finding potential subsidies to offset the costs. Boston Harbor Now has been working on the routes for essentially two years.

→Source: The Boston Globe

VIDEO: Conservation Law Foundation Discusses Challenge to Downtown Waterfront Municipal Harbor Plan

Peter Shelley of the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) provided an update on the non-profit’s legal challenge to the Downtown Waterfront Municipal Harbor Plan. After the State approved the Municipal Harbor Plan last year, CLF and abutting Harbor Towers, filed separate lawsuits to challenge the plan’s legality. After reviewing the history and intended MHP scope, Shelley and CLF are highlighting three specific concerns.

→Source: North End Waterfront

Non-Profit The Harborkeepers Begin Year Of Boston Harbor Cleanups

Community activists helped to clean up Boston Harbor’s coastline this weekend. The Harborkeepers, a non-profit, began their year of cleanups Saturday at LoPresti Park in East Boston.

→Source: WBZ NewsRadio

Seaport ferries get a boost

Nonprofit Boston Harbor Now is gearing up to pitch state officials on Thursday about two ferry routes: one linking several inner harbor docks, including Fan Pier in the Seaport, and the other making a beeline for Quincy. All this is good news for the traffic-congested Seaport. The South Boston Waterfront has been served by just a single commuter boat, one that visits only a few times a day. The additional service could bring hundreds of additional commuters daily over water, instead of by car or bus.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Resilient Mystic collaborative invites new municipal partners

Facilitated by the Mystic River Watershed Association and the Consensus Building Institute, the RMC is focused on three key goals: collectively manage stormwater quantity and quality, decrease risks to critical infrastructure in the Lower Mystic and increase the resilience of vulnerable residents during and after extreme weather events. Having now established these goals and other foundational governance mechanisms for the collaborative, the group is eager to expand to include the remaining 11 Mystic River Watershed communities.

→Source: Arlington Wicked Local

Report: CLF Releases Study of Flooding in Boston’s Waterfront Open Spaces

The report, “Climate Change and the Massachusetts Public Waterfront Act,” highlights how climate change and flooding will threaten public access to coastal tidelands across Massachusetts, as well as the changes the Commonwealth needs to make to protect this access.27

→Source: Conservation Law Foundation

Port of Boston needs (regulatory) attention

Kudos to Boston Harbor Now’s Jill Valdes Horwood and James Aloisi from TransitMatters for highlighting the need to rethink industrial ports like Boston (“Boston’s Port Needs Attention”). While their insights and observations were spot-on, they left me wanting to read more and get into the seaweed on how to implement their vision. Here’s one possible approach.

→Source: CommonWealth Magazine

Report: Recommendations for the Future of Boston’s Working Waterfront

The second installment of Innovation in Boston’s Working Port focuses on developing recommendations that respond to the needs of Boston’s working waterfront and the four themes that emerged from [Boston Harbor Now’s] discussions with stakeholders, industry experts, advocates, and city and state officials: Growth, Flexibility, Synergy, and Change.

→Source: Boston Harbor Now

Opinion: Boston’s port needs attention

Today, Boston’s port economy supports more than 50,000 jobs and creates $4.6 billion in economic value for the city, the state, and the region. To preserve and strengthen Boston’s working ports during a time of rapid development and climate change we urge Massport to continue its focus on the working port and take steps to further modernize Boston’s maritime economy.

→Source: CommonWealth Magazine

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