News

Community activists helped to clean up Boston Harbor’s coastline this weekend. The Harborkeepers, a non-profit, began their year of cleanups Saturday at LoPresti Park in East Boston.

→Source: WBZ NewsRadio

Seaport ferries get a boost

Nonprofit Boston Harbor Now is gearing up to pitch state officials on Thursday about two ferry routes: one linking several inner harbor docks, including Fan Pier in the Seaport, and the other making a beeline for Quincy. All this is good news for the traffic-congested Seaport. The South Boston Waterfront has been served by just a single commuter boat, one that visits only a few times a day. The additional service could bring hundreds of additional commuters daily over water, instead of by car or bus.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Resilient Mystic collaborative invites new municipal partners

Facilitated by the Mystic River Watershed Association and the Consensus Building Institute, the RMC is focused on three key goals: collectively manage stormwater quantity and quality, decrease risks to critical infrastructure in the Lower Mystic and increase the resilience of vulnerable residents during and after extreme weather events. Having now established these goals and other foundational governance mechanisms for the collaborative, the group is eager to expand to include the remaining 11 Mystic River Watershed communities.

→Source: Arlington Wicked Local

Report: CLF Releases Study of Flooding in Boston’s Waterfront Open Spaces

The report, “Climate Change and the Massachusetts Public Waterfront Act,” highlights how climate change and flooding will threaten public access to coastal tidelands across Massachusetts, as well as the changes the Commonwealth needs to make to protect this access.27

→Source: Conservation Law Foundation

Port of Boston needs (regulatory) attention

Kudos to Boston Harbor Now’s Jill Valdes Horwood and James Aloisi from TransitMatters for highlighting the need to rethink industrial ports like Boston (“Boston’s Port Needs Attention”). While their insights and observations were spot-on, they left me wanting to read more and get into the seaweed on how to implement their vision. Here’s one possible approach.

→Source: CommonWealth Magazine

Report: Recommendations for the Future of Boston’s Working Waterfront

The second installment of Innovation in Boston’s Working Port focuses on developing recommendations that respond to the needs of Boston’s working waterfront and the four themes that emerged from [Boston Harbor Now’s] discussions with stakeholders, industry experts, advocates, and city and state officials: Growth, Flexibility, Synergy, and Change.

→Source: Boston Harbor Now

Opinion: Boston’s port needs attention

Today, Boston’s port economy supports more than 50,000 jobs and creates $4.6 billion in economic value for the city, the state, and the region. To preserve and strengthen Boston’s working ports during a time of rapid development and climate change we urge Massport to continue its focus on the working port and take steps to further modernize Boston’s maritime economy.

→Source: CommonWealth Magazine

Artist Leo March explores Boston waterfront

Photo-essay captures human experience, asks what we should aspire to.

Conservation Law Foundation Releases Guide to the Massachusetts Public Waterfront Act

Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) announced the release of a new People’s Guide to the Massachusetts Public Waterfront Act today. The guide provides crucial information about the rights of Massachusetts residents in connection to waterfront property in Boston and across the Commonwealth, as well as actions they can take to protect public access to Boston Harbor and other coastal tidelands.

→Source: Conservation Law Foundation

The Businesses That Benefit From A Clean Harbor Should Help Boston Address Climate Change

If we are serious about a vision for Boston that allows us not simply to survive rising oceans, but to create an environment and conditions under which our city can thrive, it’s going to take substantial contribution and involvement from the private sector. Because it’s going to be expensive.

→Source: WBUR

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