Policy

Video: North End/Downtown Neighborhood Climate Planning Kicks Off With High Resident Engagement

The City of Boston hosted a poster session to introduce the Climate Ready North End and Downtown projects at a March 12th meeting. Residents filled the Pilot House venue to capacity to hear from city officials and take part in the planning exercise.

→Source: North End Waterfront

Resilient Mystic collaborative invites new municipal partners

Facilitated by the Mystic River Watershed Association and the Consensus Building Institute, the RMC is focused on three key goals: collectively manage stormwater quantity and quality, decrease risks to critical infrastructure in the Lower Mystic and increase the resilience of vulnerable residents during and after extreme weather events. Having now established these goals and other foundational governance mechanisms for the collaborative, the group is eager to expand to include the remaining 11 Mystic River Watershed communities.

→Source: Arlington Wicked Local

Report: CLF Releases Study of Flooding in Boston’s Waterfront Open Spaces

The report, “Climate Change and the Massachusetts Public Waterfront Act,” highlights how climate change and flooding will threaten public access to coastal tidelands across Massachusetts, as well as the changes the Commonwealth needs to make to protect this access.27

→Source: Conservation Law Foundation

Port of Boston needs (regulatory) attention

Kudos to Boston Harbor Now’s Jill Valdes Horwood and James Aloisi from TransitMatters for highlighting the need to rethink industrial ports like Boston (“Boston’s Port Needs Attention”). While their insights and observations were spot-on, they left me wanting to read more and get into the seaweed on how to implement their vision. Here’s one possible approach.

→Source: CommonWealth Magazine

Report: Recommendations for the Future of Boston’s Working Waterfront

The second installment of Innovation in Boston’s Working Port focuses on developing recommendations that respond to the needs of Boston’s working waterfront and the four themes that emerged from [Boston Harbor Now’s] discussions with stakeholders, industry experts, advocates, and city and state officials: Growth, Flexibility, Synergy, and Change.

→Source: Boston Harbor Now

Opinion: Boston’s port needs attention

Today, Boston’s port economy supports more than 50,000 jobs and creates $4.6 billion in economic value for the city, the state, and the region. To preserve and strengthen Boston’s working ports during a time of rapid development and climate change we urge Massport to continue its focus on the working port and take steps to further modernize Boston’s maritime economy.

→Source: CommonWealth Magazine

Boston Harbor cleanup was economically justifiable, finds new study

A first-of-its-kind study finds that Boston Harbor—once dubbed America’s filthiest harbor—is now worth between $30 and $100 billion in ecosystem services. The study demonstrates that the post-cleanup value of healthy ecosystems and their associated benefits to society should be considered when evaluating options for coastal areas.

→Source: ScienceDaily

Editorial: Boston Harbor is clean but could face new threats to marine life: plastics and drugs

The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority has fulfilled its mission of cleaning up Boston Harbor — and without adverse impacts farther out into Massachusetts Bay. … So far, so healthy. Now the question comes whether the MWRA’s expertise should be turned toward monitoring new and emerging threats to the marine environment: plastics, pharmaceuticals, hormones, nutrients, industrial chemicals, and the like.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Conservation Law Foundation Releases Guide to the Massachusetts Public Waterfront Act

Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) announced the release of a new People’s Guide to the Massachusetts Public Waterfront Act today. The guide provides crucial information about the rights of Massachusetts residents in connection to waterfront property in Boston and across the Commonwealth, as well as actions they can take to protect public access to Boston Harbor and other coastal tidelands.

→Source: Conservation Law Foundation

Downtown Waterfront Coastal Resilience Study

Starting in 2019, this study will be conducted in various neighborhoods, including the Wharf District, as part of city’s Resilient Boston Harbor vision to protect our waterfront from rising sea level and climate change.

→Source: North End Waterfront

Recurring events