Parks

The Secret to Good Health May Be a Walk in the Park

In Minneapolis-St. Paul, the nation’s healthiest urban region, almost everyone lives within a 10-minute walk of a good public park. Shouldn’t we all?

→Source: The New York Times

Editorial: Voters say raise my taxes to preserve parks, but Beacon Hill isn’t keeping up with demand

The Community Preservation Act is so popular for a simple reason: It works, and taxpayers who vote for it can see the tangible results in their parks and neighborhoods. It’s improving the quality of life in Massachusetts, and well worth additional investment from the state.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Downtown Waterfront Coastal Resilience Study

Starting in 2019, this study will be conducted in various neighborhoods, including the Wharf District, as part of city’s Resilient Boston Harbor vision to protect our waterfront from rising sea level and climate change.

→Source: North End Waterfront

The Businesses That Benefit From A Clean Harbor Should Help Boston Address Climate Change

If we are serious about a vision for Boston that allows us not simply to survive rising oceans, but to create an environment and conditions under which our city can thrive, it’s going to take substantial contribution and involvement from the private sector. Because it’s going to be expensive.

→Source: WBUR

Reimagining the Future of Boston’s Waterfront

Nick Black of The Trustees guest authors a blog post on what Trustees learned in a recent survey of Boston residents, with widespread support for a waterfront that is resilient and open to all.

→Source: Barr Foundation

Building a waterfront park in Boston can be tricky

Erickson [of Trustees of Reservations] plans to remind members on Thursday that the Trustees’ roots are here, in the city of Boston, growing from an initial goal of carving out open space as the city became industrialized more than a century ago. Boston is in the midst of a new kind of boom now, but Erickson says the importance of connecting the public with the waterfront hasn’t changed.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Mayor’s Column: How We Are Addressing Climate Change in Boston

“I am proud of the progress that Boston has made this year in so many areas, but there is one area of concern which impacts our future more than any other: climate change. It’s an urgent priority, and one which Boston must take aggressive steps to address if we hope to continue down this path towards a more prosperous, equitable, and resilient society.”

→Source: North End Waterfront

Regional CEO group to look at Detroit’s public spaces

“Everyone is focused on public space right now and improving it in Detroit as the city comes back,” [Laura] Trudeau said. Despite the disparate ownership, management and funding streams, it’s important to think holistically about Detroit’s public spaces, she said. “The value of the system is the sum of all the parts.”

→Source: Crain's Detroit Business

City plan for Dot waterfront resilience rests in state hands

Dorchester’s climate plan, as Walsh described it, is largely pinned to massive state-controlled projects like the Morrissey Boulevard redesign, the continuation of the Neponset Greenway across a particularly flooding-susceptible leg of the harbor marsh, and the 20-acre Bayside site, presently owned by UMass.

→Source: Dorchester Reporter

A Storm-Resilient Park in Queens

Once a hodge-podge of industrial sites, the waterfront where Newtown Creek empties into the East River has transformed into an 11-acre greenery replete with native wildlife, marshlands, a ship-like scenic overlook of Manhattan’s skyline, a cafe, playground, dog park, kayak launch pad, outdoor gym, and more.

→Source: CityLab

Recurring events