Public Way

Chelsea Creek Visioning Community Meeting

Help shape the future of the Chelsea Creek waterfront in Chelsea and East Boston. Breakfast and lunch, interpretation, and childcare will be provided.

Date: June 1, 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Location: Kelly Elementary School, Mary C. Burke Complex, Chelsea
More Information: facebook.com/events

TACC Waterways Data Walk – Connecting Residents of Roxbury and North Dorchester to Boston’s Waterfront

Explore what The American City Coalition (TACC) and partners Kelley Chunn & Associates and Denterlein have learned from their Waterways project and discuss solutions for building a stronger connection between Boston’s neighborhoods and the waterfront.

Date: May 31, 8:00–10:00 a.m.
Location: Boston Society of Architects, 290 Congress Street, Boston
RSVP: Email charlotte_rice@tamcc.org by May 24

Ferry Proposal Aims To Connect Downtown, Dorchester And Quincy

Development along Boston’s waterfront has led to greater demand for transportation, and that need could be met by new ferries serving downtown Boston, Quincy and Dorchester, according to two business plans released Tuesday.

→Source: WBUR

Nonprofit floats details about new proposed Boston Harbor ferry routes

The business plans for two new Boston Harbor ferry routes are done. Now comes the hard part: finding someone willing to secure and administer these boats, and finding potential subsidies to offset the costs. Boston Harbor Now has been working on the routes for essentially two years.

→Source: The Boston Globe

VIDEO: Conservation Law Foundation Discusses Challenge to Downtown Waterfront Municipal Harbor Plan

Peter Shelley of the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) provided an update on the non-profit’s legal challenge to the Downtown Waterfront Municipal Harbor Plan. After the State approved the Municipal Harbor Plan last year, CLF and abutting Harbor Towers, filed separate lawsuits to challenge the plan’s legality. After reviewing the history and intended MHP scope, Shelley and CLF are highlighting three specific concerns.

→Source: North End Waterfront

Beyond the glass box: Architecture in the Seaport is just starting to get interesting

A little over two years ago, developer Michael Phillips told architect David Manfredi to his face that the biggest liability of Boston’s Seaport District was “uninspiring architecture.” … [T]here have been similar critiques for years that the Seaport is full of cold, glass boxes — and it’s starting to be more openly discussed. At least some of the developers of the remaining blocks of property in the neighborhood aim to tackle the critique head-on.

→Source: Boston Business Journal

Public, but hidden: Boston needs to call out its secret spaces

Privately owned public spaces: What could be more oxymoronic? But Boston is full of seemingly public places — like Post Office Square Park, or the popular “adult playground” called the Lawn on D — that are actually controlled by private developers who can restrict them at will. And there are many seemingly private spaces — like office lobbies and rooftop decks — that are actually open to all. Welcome to the ad hoc, hodgepodge, public-use puzzle that is Boston.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Seaport ferries get a boost

Nonprofit Boston Harbor Now is gearing up to pitch state officials on Thursday about two ferry routes: one linking several inner harbor docks, including Fan Pier in the Seaport, and the other making a beeline for Quincy. All this is good news for the traffic-congested Seaport. The South Boston Waterfront has been served by just a single commuter boat, one that visits only a few times a day. The additional service could bring hundreds of additional commuters daily over water, instead of by car or bus.

→Source: The Boston Globe

Calls Build For Ferry Service On ‘Underutilized’ Columbia Point

Academic and business leaders in Dorchester’s Columbia Point are looking to increase transportation options by adding a ferry stop in the quickly developing neighborhood that borders Boston Harbor.

→Source: WBUR

Port of Boston needs (regulatory) attention

Kudos to Boston Harbor Now’s Jill Valdes Horwood and James Aloisi from TransitMatters for highlighting the need to rethink industrial ports like Boston (“Boston’s Port Needs Attention”). While their insights and observations were spot-on, they left me wanting to read more and get into the seaweed on how to implement their vision. Here’s one possible approach.

→Source: CommonWealth Magazine

Recurring events